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School of Computer Science

Community Involvement

In addition to my primary job of being a research assistant, I also undertake other voluntary duties, both within the university and with other organisations.

Peer Reviewer

As part of my involvement within the research community, I have reviewed papers for the following:

  1. Hypertext 2011: The 22nd International ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia
  2. ASSETS 2010: The 12th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers & Accessibility.
  3. ICCHP 2010: The 13th International Conference on Computers Helping People with Special Needs.
  4. W4A 2010: The 7th International Cross-Disciplinary Conference on Web Accessibility.
  5. ASSETS 2009: The 11th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers & Accessibility.
  6. ASSETS 2008: The 10th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers & Accessibility.
  7. ICCHP 2008: The 11th International Conference on Computers Helping People with Special Needs.
  8. ASSETS 2006: The 8th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers & Accessibility.

Conference Organising Committee

As part of my involvement within the research community, I have been involved in the organising committee for the following conferences:

  1. Web / Art / Science Camp 2010: Worked as part of the organisation team for the Web / Art / Science Camp. This was an informal event that brought together poets, professionals, startup warriors, and academics in the humanities and political/social sciences to discuss and demo works in non-linear formats.
  2. Hypertext 2010 Panel Session Organiser: For Hypertext 2010, I organised and chaired a panel entitled Past Visions of Hypertext and Their Influence on Us Today in celebration of Vannevar Bush’s seminal paper As We May Think being published in in Atlantic Monthly 65 years earlier. The panel consisted of Panelists: Mark Bernstein; Cathy Marshall; Frank Tompa; and Nathan Matias and discussed how previous hypertext systems envisaged collecting, storing, associating, and presenting knowledge to the user.
  3. ASSETS 2008 Media Chair: For ASSETS 2008, I acted as the media chair, in charge of designing, creating and maintaining the Website and all media related content for the conference.
  4. Hypertext 2007 Graduate Student Birds of a Feather Meeting Co-Chair: For Hypertext 2007, I, along with my colleague Dr Eleni Michailidou, Co-Chaired the Graduate Student Birds of a Feather Meeting which allowed students to network with their peers, discuss their research and share ideas in a friendly setting.
  5. Hypertext 2007 Media Chair: For Hypertext 2007, I acted as the media chair, in charge of designing, creating and maintaining the Website and all media related content for the conference.

School of Computer Science

I have held a number of roles and positions of responsibility within the University of Manchester’s School of Computer Science including:

  1. School Representation (2006 — present): I have represented the School of Computer Science at a number of events and panel sessions including:
    • The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council International Review Panel that discussed the career development and general support the School, University, and Research Council provided to upcoming researchers.
    • Contributed to an external review of the Schools of Computer Science and Informatics that analysed and commented on the degree of overlap between the two schools and recommended options for the organisation of research and teaching in computing at the University of Manchester.
    • Google Developer Day 2007, an event that brought together Web developers to discuss Google’s latest Web technologies and APIs. The event was held simultaneously in nine countries and broadcast live over the Web.
  2. School Visit Days (2008 — present): I run a short session demonstrating some of the research that the School conducts within the Web Ergonomics Lab and how this can positively affect the students' education whilst they are at the school.
  3. Laboratory Demonstrator (2005 — 2009): The School of Computer Science provides practical lab sessions for students who are on the taught courses. This allows them to gain practical experience in applying the theory that has been taught in the lectures. Demonstrating involves providing assistance to students in these labs as well as assessing coursework and taking attendance. I have demonstrated on the following courses:
  4. PhD Mentor (2006 — 2009): The first year of a PhD can be difficult and so the School Of Computer Science offers a mentoring service. Mentors - myself included - are second and third year students who provide advice to first year PhD students with regards to any concerns they have about their studies. To lighten the mood, we also organise the odd social event to enable the first years to get to know each other in a less formal setting. For more information, please visit the mentor’s Website.

Web Ergonomics Lab

I have held a number of roles and positions of responsibility within the Information Management Group’s Web Ergonomics Lab including:

  1. Website Designer/Maintainer (2006 — present): I, along with my colleague Dr Yeliz Yesilada, designed and maintained the Web Ergonomics Lab Website which included setting up infrastructure, such as blogs, wikis, and data repositories and ensuring information was easily reachable and accessible.
  2. Journal Paper Review Group Co-Founder (2007 — 2008): The Journal Paper Review Group was a mechanism for sharing experience and information to junior members of the research group. I, along with my colleague Dr Eleni Michailidou, co-founded the review sessions, holding them on a regular basis. The purpose of these review sessions was to discuss conference and journal papers that members of the group had recently read. The aims of the meetings were to:
    • Transfer scientific paper reading skills to junior members of the team. The ability to critically analyse publications in order to establish the contribution that the paper claims to make to the field is essential for research.
    • Gain practice at dissecting papers and extracting the strengths and weaknesses of what is written. Just because a paper is published, does not mean it is good.
    • Share knowledge of papers. A group of people independently reading and communicating papers provides an effective way of discovering publications that may otherwise have been overlooked.